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Posts Tagged ‘home care’

First Home Care Provider Class Graduates from Lincoln Home

Six Home Care Providers Complete Twenty Hour Excellence in Care-Giving Class

Training came to a close today after twenty hours of training spread over a five week period.  Class participants learned a range of handy skills for in-home care-giving.  Lincoln Home’s Giving Excellent Care in the Home: From Our Home to Yours curriculum centers on simple but important skills that boost confidence and help home care givers gain insight.

Class topics cover a broad range of skills.  Right from the start students jump in with both feet, taking on subjects like personal values, home safety, and how to help granny with her dentures.  Learning different skills and techniques help students become more confident providers.

 I enjoyed the activities and games that really enhanced learning.

Student feedback helps us know what we’re doing well and what we can do better.  It’s exciting to hear how the class was received, and even more exciting to know we’ve made a difference in our community with this class offering.

I gained so much through this class.  I now have a different perspective and feel more confident caring for my stepfather.

I liked the way we reviewed chapters after reading them.  It felt easier to take in the lessons that way.

I learned about all aspects of daily living.  I gained a lot of new information and recognize that every care-giving situation is going to be different.  This class is fantastic!

I liked the interaction with other students during activities.

We all got off to a good start that provided ease of sharing information and asking questions.

I learned a lot about care-giving.  The biggest lesson I take away from this class is “someone else’s emergency is not my emergency.”  

Please stay tuned.  Lincoln Home will offer this course again in the fall of 2017. 

care giving, death, home care

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Excellent Kick-off for “Giving Excellent Care”

Giving Excellent Care in the Home: From Our Home to Yours

Our Giving Excellent Care class started April 11, 2017 at 9:00am.  As facilitator, I experienced excitement, anticipation, and just a little bit of anxiety in the weeks leading up to the start of class.  I truly want people to have a good experience at Lincoln Home.  I want our guests to enjoy what they are learning.  Truthfully, I personally want to make and maintain good first impressions that will eventually lead to long-standing relationships with the people in our community.  

I am super excited to have gotten everyone through the first day in one piece, and I’m looking forward to what unfolds over the next 4 weeks in our class.

Building Excellent Relationships in Care-Giving

Seven eager faces reflected a variety of emotions as we started.  

“What will this class be like?

“Will I know anyone else here?”

“What have I gotten myself in to?”

As an educator, I’m excited that people want to learn.  As a human being, I’m thrilled when people want to learn and gain skills that later will enhance their future with other human beings.  How we are in relation to others is far more important than what we know or what we do, to my way of thinking.  It’s really cool when people are ready to jump into that idea, being willing to explore the many ways they approach life and living in relationship to caring for others.

Day one topics included:

Care-Giving Values

Healthy Care-Giving Boundaries

Stress and Burn-Out

Rights, Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation

We learned about care-giver ethics.  We discovered that excellent means different things to different people.  We explored what it means to be a guest in someone else’s home, helping them when they may be feeling vulnerable or at risk.  Students inquired into all the reasons they have for not providing self-care, which is a required skill and essential practice for the care-giver’s own long-term health and well-being.  The best part is it seems the students are looking forward to how the rest of the class goes. 

And so am I.

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How to Organize a Group to Care for a Friend Who is Seriously Ill

How to Organize a Group to Care for a Friend Who is Seriously Ill
Monday, Feb 20, 3:00 to 4:00PM, at the Lincoln Home
A class by Lincoln Home managers Steve Raymond and Valerie Lovelace

Steve and Val will provide tools, tips and tales on forming a beneficial care giving group. A well organized group benefits the recipients and givers of care in ways simple and profound.

Read more in the story below by Steve Raymond

I am in an advanced stage of cancer,” Betty said, “and I have to start chemotherapy and radiation next week.” She said it very simply and clearly, but her words hit with a heavy thud. We had become professional friends over the past couple of years. Betty is young, and her news came as a real surprise.

We talked about her cancer and her life and “how are you going to handle all this?” We wanted to help her form a plan because that’s what we do, and we don’t want her to travel this journey alone. Two conversations later, she agreed to allow me to organize a group of her personal friends in a “Share the Care” network. These friends will assist in various ways, such as transportation to appointments, picking up groceries, helping in the house … and possibly more challenging forms of assistance depending upon the course of her treatment.

Truthfully, because we have no crystal balls, we really don’t know how difficult it will be for Betty over the next months. That is why it is best to have a small network of people who are each willing to share their time and personal gifts and skills in a way that suits them best. That way, no one person becomes overwhelmed with the responsibility.

Friendship, mutual support and even love can evolve in share‐the‐care groups, with the potential to create something very special and beneficial for the supported friend and for the caregivers.

Today was our first organizational meeting. It was a very practical discussion, and at times it was an emotional discussion. That is the nature of things when you choose to step into a helping role with a person with a serious illness.

Our group has people from many backgrounds … a carpenter, writer, mom, photographer, artist, waitress, scientist… and though they don’t know each other, they are joined by the common interest to help Betty, and that is exactly what we will do. They are “all in.” So am I.

If you want to form a care‐giving group for a friend with an illness, you don’t need to reinvent the wheel. “Share the Care” is the trademarked name of an educational nonprofit with the mission of teaching people and providing tools so that friends and family members can self‐organize into a care giving group. It is an excellent small organization with a wide reach.

The book, “Share the Care: How to Organize a Group to Care for Someone Who is Seriously Ill,” by Cappy Capossela and Sheila Warnock is an excellent resource. You will find “Share the Care” at www.sharethecare.org.

If home care costs or assisted living costs are beyond your budget, a Share the Care group is a very effective way to help a friend. However, care groups are not just about money… creating a caring community benefits everyone. This is where our aging Maine society is headed, not trying to tough it out alone, but joining in creative collaboration with each other, and perhaps at a later time, receiving such help ourselves.

I have personally seen the power and benefit of this type of care giving group. It is beautiful and amazing what you can accomplish. I first met STC founder Sheila Warnock in Monterey several years ago. I have spoken with her recently, and we are seeking to have her speak to a conference of Maine senior care professionals in 2017.

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